ICEA's Overarching purpose is to achieve reconciliation through mutual respect for all Australians.

According to Reconciliation Australia, the majority of young Australians (81%) have a strong desire to advance reconciliation, but less than half know how to go about it.

We believe that to facilitate truly genuine reconciliation and mutual respect, it is important to work with both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth together. For this reason, our programs don’t solely focus on one or the other group, but instead bring Western Australian youth together.

Our philosophy is that everyone undergoes his or her own reconciliation learning journey, or ‘Kuditjiny’ ('journey of attaining more knowledge' in Noongar.) Our actions are driven by the belief that we can support this journey through:

  • Facilitating positive experiences

  • Building strong, genuine relationships

  • Fostering greater cross-cultural understanding

These form our three pillar philosophy, which underpins our day-to-day operations and the evolution of our programs. We have a range of programs that you can get involved in – taking place everywhere from high schools across the state, to Perth beaches, to remote parts of the Kimberley:

From primary school students to young graduates, our activities provide unique opportunities for young people to form a greater understanding of reconciliation and Aboriginal culture, build meaningful friendships, break down cultural and social barriers and build their inner strength and confidence.

To me, ICEA is about bringing non-Indigenous and Indigenous kids together in a series of fun activities and creating friendships between these kids and respect
— Jasirah Bin Hitam, Bardi girl from One Arm Point

Our programs are designed to empower participants by equipping them with the skills, knowledge, connections and resources they require to become allies in reconciliation in Western Australia. Participants also have a chance to develop experience in leadership, mentoring, activism and event coordination – all of which not only benefit those who take part, but the broader communities they belong to.


There still remains a large degree of ignorance about Indigenous culture throughout the major cities of Australia, hence the need for ICEA to engage young people to promote Indigenous cultural awareness and build understanding throughout WA.
— Roger Bayly, Former ICEA Director and Deputy Headmaster of Christchurch Grammar School
 
This diagram was painted by Ray and Aiden Albert, a mother and son who are Bardi Nyul Nyul people from the Kimberley. The diagram demonstrates the way in which ICEA’s programs work together to create the experiences, relationships and understanding necessary to foster reconciliation and respect between young Australians.

This diagram was painted by Ray and Aiden Albert, a mother and son who are Bardi Nyul Nyul people from the Kimberley. The diagram demonstrates the way in which ICEA’s programs work together to create the experiences, relationships and understanding necessary to foster reconciliation and respect between young Australians.